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Ebola and Other News Events

For someone living with dementia, news programs or articles can be confusing and a source of stress, especially when it involves a major crisis. News of the recent Ebola outbreaks, which have made their way to the United States, have caused distress for even the most present thinkers.

With dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), our executive functioning is impacted. This means we may face a decline in our ability to recognize time and space, our ability to reason, and our ability to retain and recall details.

Alzheimer's Awareness

Each year, October 10th is designated as World Mental Health Day. It is an opportunity to raise awareness and encourage action. And while 2014’s theme was focused on schizophrenia, our focus on dementia and Alzheimer’s never ends.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s are agonizing diseases; not only for the person diagnosed, but also for friends, family, and loved ones. And while each person experiences the disease in different ways, a universal norm is that that life can be significantly altered for everyone involved.

Whether you are the patient or the loved one, you should never feel embarrassed of the impact of Alzheimer’s on your life. If you are struggling, know you are not alone. These stories that we’ve discovered might give you the confidence you need to open up or reach out.

The ‘Goldilocks Effect’ of Alzheimer’s

Most of us are familiar with the—too much…too little…just right—story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Something similar happens inside the brains, and around the lives, of individuals with Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s is a disease not of just one person, but a condition that affects the entire family. There may be hard times and challenges, but with some small changes you can add quality to this time of life and make new, special memories that you might not have thought possible.

How to know when a loved-one needs help

Our aging loved-ones are in transition.  The loss of family members and friends, a change in living arrangements, changes in fitness and health, the loss of driving privileges, even the death of a pet all put a loved-one under stress and may place them at risk.  With these life-changes it's completely normal for our loved-ones to show temporary signs of depression, irritability, forgetfulness and minor self-neglect.  But how how can you tell the difference between normal and temporary responses to stress and when it's something more concerning or more permanent?
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